Short is good: Using Short Text (folktales/fables, newspaper articles, poetry) to Jazz-up your Reading/Writing Curriculum and Advance Students’ Literacy Skills

Short is good: Using Short Text (folktales/fables, newspaper articles, poetry) to Jazz-up your Reading/Writing Curriculum and Advance Students’ Literacy Skills

How to Enroll: Visit the enrollment page

​Monday, September 30, 2019 9:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Location: Montec Building, 1121 East Broadway, Missoula, MT in the large conference room
Presenter: Ann Ellsworth
Registration: $100
For educators of grades 2-8
6 OPI renewal units
Coffee and snacks provided. Lunch on your own.
Course # 18551016

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP:
This presentation focuses on rethinking how teachers can use short text to help students “read like writers.” We know that lengthy text selections can be intimidating for struggling readers, but they can gain confidence and reading skill when they practice with short pieces. We’ll examine various types of short text–including poetry, newspapers and magazine articles–and explore how targeted focus on close reading strategies can advance students’ understanding context clues, text structure, vocabulary development, and inference and summarizing skills.
Bring your laptops or wireless device.

​About the presenter:
Ann Ellsworth has taught in elementary and secondary schools in Wisconsin and Montana, and has led reading and writing professional development workshops across Montana and the Midwest. She is the 2019 National Council of Teachers of English’s (NCTE) “Grammar Teacher of the Year.” The Association of Teachers of English Grammar (ATEG) is an arm of NCTE. She was awarded the 2016 Montana Reading Teacher of the Year, and was a finalist for two national teaching awards. Presently she works with teacher candidates at Montana State University-Bozeman She has served as editor of the MONTANA STATE READING JOURNAL and is working with a publisher on a book on how to improve student writing.

Handwriting Without Tears K-3

The Handwriting Without Tears® curriculum draws from years of innovation and research to provide developmentally appropriate, multisensory tools and strategies for your classroom. The program follows research that demonstrates children learn more effectively by actively doing, with materials that address all styles of learning.

We teach effectively with joy. We have figured out easier, happier ways for children to master handwriting. Handwriting Without Tears is dedicated to developing excellent materials for children and training for teachers. As a result, millions of students have successfully used our program. The result truly is handwriting without tears! 

How to Enroll: Visit Handwriting Without Tears K-3 on the CSPD Region IV website

Writing Improvement: Sharpen Prose with Focused Revision (Open enrollment until Nov. 15, 2019)

This self-paced, 2-credit online Moodle course is designed to develop participants’ knowledge of writing improvement through an inquiry approach that involves reflective decision-making and critical thinking. We will study how revision differs from editing. Then we will explore specific strategies that start at the sentence level and transition to paragraph improvement. Knowing how to make improvements with paragraphs (internal text structure) lays the foundation to target external text structure (or the overall unity)—whether it is a personal narrative or critical essay.

Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the elements of effective written.
2. Compare and contrast editing and revision.
3. Describe and practice using strategies that foster improvement at the sentence, paragraph, and paper level.
4. Describe how beginnings and endings can be targeted for improvement.
5. Conduct effective revision in personal and professional (classroom) writing.

This course is intended for those who are interested in studying how teachers can impact their students’ written work with targeted revision.

Dates: This is a self-paced course. As such, course participants must be comfortable working independently and self-motivated to complete all work within the flexible time frame. Participants may register for the course now.  No new registrations will be accepted after November 15, 2019. Participants must complete the course by December 15, 2019.

How to Enroll: Visit the registration website

IEFA/NGSS Workshop: The Bitterroot Suite

The Bitterroot Suite is an integration of Native American traditional beliefs and spirituality persisting into modern day life as tribal cultures, traditions still practiced by many American Indian people today (EU#3) with the NGSS practices of science and engineering. We begin with a Lab Report Bootcamp, a formative assessment, to identify students’ needs on writing scientific procedures while conducting a engineering investigation of materials and tools used by Native Americans in different regions in the U.S. By the end of this daylong workshop teachers will have created their own bootcamp for their students using The Bitterroot to grow in a lab setting by testing soil conditions and construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Kim Quigley is an Independent Educational Consultant and started CSI: Creative Solutions for Instruction after teaching for 40 years. She now consults for small schools, Southwest Montana School Services (SWMSS) and writes curriculum for OPI/IEFA. Her latest adventure in this endeavor is integrating IEFA Essential Understandings with the NGSS standards. The Bitterroot Suite is one these integrated curriculums.

How to Enroll: Visit the Next Generation Science Standards/Indian Education for All workshop registration page

Writing Well: Telling Stories People Notice

Compelling, concise writing is an art. In this three-day workshop, you’ll learn the fundamentals applicable to all forms of good, solid writing. From social media and websites to nonprofit and business communication, instructor Jule Banville will guide you through the basics of journalistic writing via example, discussion, and practice. With 10 years of experience teaching writing at the University of Montana’s School of Journalism and 20 years working as an editor, Jule will teach you how to write clean, concise, engaging content across multiple applications. Customized instruction throughout ensures you’ll leave with relevant skills for your work.

How to Enroll: Visit Writing Well: Telling Stories People Notice on Montana Media Lab’s website.

Writing in Science Summer Institute

Writing in Science! July 7-9, 2019 at Fairmont Hot Springs. Free for teachers, participants will only need to pay for their lodging cost and a couple of meals. Register today for this wonderful opportunity. This 3-day Summer Writing Intensive provides Montana teachers with a community of learners, writers, and practitioners in writing and science with incredible strategies and resources to take to your classroom.

Maximizing Mentor Texts: Teaching Writing in a Connected Way self-paced online Moodle course: Fall 2019

Maximizing Mentor Texts: Teaching Writing in a Connected Way
​(Fall of 2019)

How to Enroll: Visit the enrollment page

This 8 week, self-paced, online Moodle course is intended for classroom teachers and/or graduate students who are interested in studying writing in school contexts. In particular, the focus is on analytic writing, which has traditionally been overlooked in favor of narrative writing forms. Major course objectives are to help class participants become more confident with teaching analytical writing and writing analytically themselves in the content disciplines they teach.

Event Number: 18551008
EDU 455/C&I 555
Instructors: Daisy Carlsmith/Ann Ellsworth
Dates: This is a self-paced course. As such, course participants must be comfortable working independently and self-motivated to complete all work within the flexible time frame. Participants may register for the course now. No new registrations will be accepted after November 15, 2019. Participants must complete the course by December 15, 2019.

Upon receipt of course payment by WMPLC, the instructor will enter the student into the course Moodle and send an introductory email, at which time the participant may begin the class. The instructor will then collect the UM credit paperwork and payment, which will be sent to the University of Montana on December 15, 2019, along with final grades.

Registration fee: $240
Credit: 30 OPI Renewal Units or 2 Semester Credits pending (semester credits are offered through the University of Montana and are an additional fee of $155. The course instructor will provide a separate registration form).​
This course requires the participant to access a couple of texts through their school or public library or purchase said materials from booksellers such as Amazon. The instructor may be available to assist with locating copies, if needed.

Course description:
​This two-credit graduate-level course explores how mentor texts can be used to jump-start analytical writing: writing to inform and explain, writing arguments, and writing to evaluate (Common Core Anchor Standards 1 through 3.) We will study forms of written discourse and identify genre characteristics of expository writing. Students will analyze writing assignments for developing student-writers and then adapt these to more complex, layered writing exercises. Participants will learn about analytical writing from a teacher’s perspective as well as from direct experiences with composing pieces that inform and explain, that take a position and propose a solution, and that evaluate and form judgments based on evidence.

​Learning outcomes:
Participants will be able to
1. Describe the elements of effective written communication.
2. Contrast analytic writing forms from narrative structures.
3. Analyze written pieces (students’ own compositions and those from mentor texts) for words/phrases that reflect genre requirements.
4. Identify mentor texts that match to aspects of effective writing (namely: word choice, organization, and sentence structure)
5. Define RAFT and within that writing framework, identify various formats, purposes, and intended audiences
6. Examine grade-level writing standards and design appropriate age-level analytical writing assignments.
7. Compare journal articles that discuss best instructional practices for advancing student writers.

Required texts:
Write Like This
Author: Kelly Gallagher
Stenhouse Publishers, 2013

Beyond the 5-Paragraph Essay: How to Write Analytical Essays
Authors: Kimberly Campbell and Kristi Latimer
Stenhouse Publishers, 2012

Other online sources, including journal articles from writing scholars

Recommended text:
The Classroom Teacher’s Guide to Struggling Writers
Authors: Curt Dudley-Marling and Patricia Paugh
Heinemann, 2009

​About the course facilitator:
Ann Ellsworth has taught in elementary and secondary schools in Wisconsin and Montana, and has led reading and writing professional development workshops across Montana and the Midwest. She is the 2019 National Council of Teachers of English’s (NCTE) “Grammar Teacher of the Year.” The Association of Teachers of English Grammar (ATEG) is an arm of NCTE. She was awarded the 2016 Montana Reading Teacher of the Year, and was a finalist for two national teaching awards. Presently she works with teacher candidates at Montana State University-Bozeman She has served as editor of the MONTANA STATE READING JOURNAL and is working with a publisher on a book on how to improve student writing.

Citizen Science and the Lewis & Clark Trail

Bring history, citizen science, NASA technologies and Montana water quality research to your out-of-school program as you meld the mystique of the Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail with modern tools for data collection.

This workshop is open to Montana educators working with youth in grade 5-12 in a classroom or out-of-school environment.

In this workshop, we will:

  • Learn basic aeronautics as we observe the flight of large kites with instrument payloads for collecting data
  • Build and fly your own kid-friendly kites
  • Follow NASA procedures and protocols to develop and answer a science mission question
  • Learn how Montana researchers use remote sensing instruments, aerial photography and environmental mapping to study water quality
  • Join the GO on the Lewis & Clark Trail Citizen Science Challenge and use the GLOBE Observer app to record observations on clouds and land cover
  • Brainstorm new ways to bring all these tools and STEM concepts back to youth, including incorporating art, writing, photography, videography and Lewis & Clark History

No prior experience is necessary.

This workshop is sponsored by the NASA Aerokats and Rovers Education Network, Montana NSF EPSCoR, MSU’s National Teachers Enhancement Network, and the MSU Science Math Resource Center with support from the Montana Afterschool Alliance and the Montana Girls STEM Collaborative.

How to Enroll: Visit the Citizen Science and the Lewis & Clark Trail website

Making It Real: A Montana Historical Society Workshop for Elementary and Middle School Teachers

Award-winning educator Jim Schulz will be joined by Elementary and Middle School Teacher Leaders in Montana History to present a six-hour workshop, which will focus on ways to incorporate writing, engage and empower students, and teach them to look for evidence to support their claims, all while making the past as real as possible. It will include sessions on Visual Thinking Strategies, using artifacts and images to teach about immigration, and presentations sharing “never-fail” strategies and resources that bring the past to life.

How to Enroll: Visit the Conferences, Workshops, and Special Events Montana Historical Society website

Yellowstone Writing Project Invitational Summer Institute

The Yellowstone Writing Project Invitational Summer Institute, which will be held M-F June 18 – June 27, 2019, with a required Pre-institute Workshop on May 4, 2019, is an intensive professional experience through which participating teachers immerse themselves in their own writing and in the study of writing instruction. Successful teachers from throughout the Yellowstone Region come together for two weeks on the campus of Montana State University to explore strategies for teaching students at all grade levels to write well and for enhancing student learning in general. Teachers work on their own writing, study current research and theory, share teaching strategies, and learn about writing and teaching.