ENROLLMENT OPENS May 10, 2020 – Orientation to Special Education for Paraeducators (May 31 – Jun. 27, 2020)

This module is designed to provide a basic introduction to special education and the needs of students who have disabilities. The content consists of introductory material regarding legal and historical foundations of special education, human growth and development, the nature of disabilities, and an introduction to the basic human needs that paraeducators must address.

Created by the University of Colorado, Par2a Center.

15 Renewal Units

Enrollment opens May 10, 2020

ENROLLMENT OPENS Dec. 20, 2019 – Orientation to Special Education for Paraeducators (Jan. 13 – Feb. 23, 2020)

This course is designed to provide a basic introduction to special education and the needs of students who have disabilities. The content consists of introductory material regarding legal and historical foundations of special education, human growth and development, the nature of disabilities, and an introduction to the basic human needs that paraeducators and educators must address.

Created by the University of Colorado, Par2a Center. Facilitated by Jenny Malloy, Park County Special Education Cooperative Director and Beckie Squires, Paraeducator Specialist

15 Renewal Units

Enrollment opens Dec. 20, 2019

Visit Orientation to Special Education for Paraeducators on the Teacher Learning Hub to enroll

46th Annual Montana History Conference “Keeping Up with the Past!”

Of special interest to: Educators and students who want to attend the Montana History Conference, Sept. 26-28

Applying for registration and travel scholarships 

Save the Date! The Montana Historical Society is putting together an amazing program for the 46th Annual Montana History Conference, “Keeping Up with the Past!” The conference will be held in Helena, September 26-28. Renewal units will be available for both the Thursday educator workshop and all conference sessions. We hope you’ll consider attending!

As in past years, we will be offering travel scholarships for both teachers and students.

About the scholarships: Funded by the Dennis and Phyllis Washington Foundation, the scholarships will consist of full conference registration plus a $275 travel/expense reimbursement. All teachers and students in Montana’s high schools, colleges, and universities are eligible to apply (residents of Helena and the vicinity are eligible for the conference registration scholarship but not the travel reimbursement).

Teacher recipients must attend the entire conference, including Thursday’s Educators Workshop and the Saturday sessions. Student recipients must commit to attending all day Friday and Saturday, including a Saturday tour.

Preference will be given to

  • Teachers and students from Montana’s tribal colleges;
  • Teachers and students from Montana’s on-reservation high schools;
  • Teachers and students from Montana’s community colleges and four-year universities;
  • Teachers and students from Montana’s small, rural, under-served communities.

Applications are due by 11:59 p.m. September 8, 2019.  Awards will be announced the following week.

Applying for a scholarship is quick and easy. Apply online.

P.S. Please don’t forget to take our short online survey. Help us improve our offerings and maybe be a winner (prizes to the fifteenth, thirty-first, forty-second person to complete this survey.)

Discovering Native Histories along the Lewis and Clark Trail Summer Institute (June 30 – July 21, 2019)

The University of Oregon and the National Endowment for the Humanities are sponsoring a summer institute called Discovering Native Histories along the Lewis and Clark Trail. The institute is an immersive journey along the Lewis and Clark Trail. The institute starts in Billings and ends two weeks later in Bismarck, ND, with stops at Pictograph Cave State Park, Deer Medicine Rocks, and other national and state parks. Stipends are available for participant expenses. The deadline to apply to attend the summer institute is March 1, 2019. Visit the institute’s website for registration information and other details.

Citizen Science and the Lewis & Clark Trail

Bring history, citizen science, NASA technologies and Montana water quality research to your out-of-school program as you meld the mystique of the Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail with modern tools for data collection.

This workshop is open to Montana educators working with youth in grade 5-12 in a classroom or out-of-school environment.

In this workshop, we will:

  • Learn basic aeronautics as we observe the flight of large kites with instrument payloads for collecting data
  • Build and fly your own kid-friendly kites
  • Follow NASA procedures and protocols to develop and answer a science mission question
  • Learn how Montana researchers use remote sensing instruments, aerial photography and environmental mapping to study water quality
  • Join the GO on the Lewis & Clark Trail Citizen Science Challenge and use the GLOBE Observer app to record observations on clouds and land cover
  • Brainstorm new ways to bring all these tools and STEM concepts back to youth, including incorporating art, writing, photography, videography and Lewis & Clark History

No prior experience is necessary.

This workshop is sponsored by the NASA Aerokats and Rovers Education Network, Montana NSF EPSCoR, MSU’s National Teachers Enhancement Network, and the MSU Science Math Resource Center with support from the Montana Afterschool Alliance and the Montana Girls STEM Collaborative.

How to Enroll: Visit the Citizen Science and the Lewis & Clark Trail website

Making It Real: A Montana Historical Society Workshop for Elementary and Middle School Teachers

Award-winning educator Jim Schulz will be joined by Elementary and Middle School Teacher Leaders in Montana History to present a six-hour workshop, which will focus on ways to incorporate writing, engage and empower students, and teach them to look for evidence to support their claims, all while making the past as real as possible. It will include sessions on Visual Thinking Strategies, using artifacts and images to teach about immigration, and presentations sharing “never-fail” strategies and resources that bring the past to life.

How to Enroll: Visit the Conferences, Workshops, and Special Events Montana Historical Society website

2019 Montana Advanced Placement Summer Institute

MSU Billings’ Montana Center for Inclusive Education is hosting the 2019 Montana Advanced Placement Summer Institute June 24 to 27, 2019 at the MSU Billings campus. Graduate credits from MSU Billings or 30 OPI renewal units are available to those who attend the summer institute. Register here to attend the institute. Sessions for this year’s institute are art and design, biology, English language and composition, statistics, and world history. Visit the institute’s website for additional details and registration information.

Prairies, Peace Pipes and Paleontology

Prairie Ecology – The grassland ecosystem in North America provides a wealth of educational opportunities at all grade levels. This portion of the class will provide an educational program to help teacher inspire students to think critically about the ecosystem they live in.
Peace Pipes – Montana’s vast history includes the Native American culture and this workshop will delve into the local history through a trip to a buffalo jump, wandering through a tipi ring site, learning the native uses of range plants and exploring the OPI Indian Education for All lesson plans.
Paleontology –Paleontology is a rich field, imbued with a long and interesting past. It is a study of what fossils tell us about the ecologies of the past and our place as humans in the world. Paleontology incorporates knowledge from biology, geology, ecology, anthropology, archaeology, and even computer science to understand the processes that have led to the origination and eventual destruction of the different types of organisms since life arose.

This is a two-day event held in Hinsdale, MT on June 11 and Fort Peck, MT on June 12.

Montana History in 9 MORE Easy Lessons: Montana’s Triple Revolution

Montana Historical Society (MHS) staff members and other subject matter experts will lead a two-month exploration of the last twelve thousand years of Montana history. Every Wednesday, 3:30-4:30, between April 3, 2019, and May 29, 2019, a presenter will discuss a major theme of Montana history. Individually, these programs will offer compelling discussions of specific topics relating to Montana’s past; together they will provide a big-picture overview of the state’s rich and fascinating history. Come for one—or come for all! OPI Renewal Credits will be available and presentations will be live-streamed for those who can’t make it in person (and ultimately archived).

Contact Kirby Lambert at the Historical Society for more information.

This week’s lesson is Montana’s Triple Revolution. Join one of the deans of Montana history to explore the state’s more recent past, from about 1960 to 1975, a formative period which Dr. Fritz describes as Montana’s “Triple Revolution.” About the speaker: Professor Emeritus Harry Fritz taught history at the University of Montana for 40 years. Generations of UM students recall the wit, verve, and color of his lectures, in which he shared his vast knowledge of American and Montana history. His awards include the 2008 H.G. Merriam Award for distinguished contribution to Montana literature, UM professor of the year in 1972 and 1999 and Montana Professor of the year 2004. In addition to his esteemed career as a Montana historian, Fritz served as a state representative from 1985 to 1989 and as a state senator from 1991 to 1995.

Montana History in 9 MORE Easy Lessons: On the Road Again

Montana Historical Society (MHS) staff members and other subject matter experts will lead a two-month exploration of the last twelve thousand years of Montana history. Every Wednesday, 3:30-4:30, between April 3, 2019, and May 29, 2019, a presenter will discuss a major theme of Montana history. Individually, these programs will offer compelling discussions of specific topics relating to Montana’s past; together they will provide a big-picture overview of the state’s rich and fascinating history. Come for one—or come for all! OPI Renewal Credits will be available and presentations will be live-streamed for those who can’t make it in person (and ultimately archived).

Contact Kirby Lambert at the Historical Society for more information.

This week’s lesson is On the Road Again. The United States economy boomed in the years following World War II and transportation networks changed dramatically. Growing suburbs, a new golden age of automobile tourism, and the rise of commercial trucking all had a profound impact on Montana. These changes sparked a boom in highway construction in the Treasure State, crowned by the completion of nearly 1,200 miles of Interstate highway by 1988. About the speaker: Jon Axline is a graduate of Montana State University and has worked at the Montana Department of Transportation since 1990. He is the author of a number of books and articles, including Conveniences Sorely Needed: Montana’s Historic Highway Bridges, Taming Big Sky Country: The History of Montana Transportation from Trails to Interstate, and “Operation Skywatch: The Montana Ground Observer Corps, 1952–1959,” which appeared in the Summer 2017 issue of Montana The Magazine of Western History.