The History of the Flathead Reservation: Indian Education for All Online Book Club Course

The History of the Flathead Reservation
Register at: https://goo.gl/forms/6bhmpPK5SGcoEx2H2
January 14 – March 3, 2019
This online Moodle course explores the history of the Flathead Reservation by studying the following texts:
In the Name of the Salish & Kootenai Nation: The 1855 Hell Gate Treaty and the Origin of the Flathead Indian Reservation by R. Bigard and C. Woodcock (1996);
A Brief History of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille Tribes by the Salish-Pend d’Oreille Culture Committee (2003);
Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition by the Salish-Pend d’Oreille Culture Committee and Elders Cultural Advisory Council (2005);
Coming Back Slow: The Importance of Preserving Salish Indian Culture and Language by Agnes Vanderburg (1995).

Through the readings, participants will examine primary and secondary documents that inform the tribal history of the Flathead Reservation. Participants will utilize their critical analysis skills while using instructional strategies within the context of multicultural education. This course is divided into weekly “modules.” Participants will have one week, starting on Monday and ending on Sunday, to complete each consecutive module. Each weekly module includes a reading assignment, an instructional strategy, and a group discussion component. The weekly assignments are due at various times each week. The last week of the course is dedicated to final projects, depending on the desired credit type. The course books are available to purchase or through your school or local library. Contact the course instructor for a copy of the syllabus.

Instructor: Sindie Kennedy (sindie.kennedy@gmail.com)
Registration fee: $175
Credit: 30 OPI Renewal Units or 2 Semester Credits (semester credit is offered through the University of Montana and is an additional fee of $155. The course instructor will provide a separate registration form and instructions for submitting payment).

Register at: https://goo.gl/forms/6bhmpPK5SGcoEx2H2

Extreme Learning for Teachers: Superfund Sites

The Museum of the Rockies (MOR), the Extreme History Project (EHP), and the Yellowstone Writing Project (YWP) have partnered to offer educators a unique opportunity to earn 3 OPI renewal units. Participants will be encouraged to attend an optional self-guided tour of the museum before registration. Starting at 5:30 p.m. we will learn about available museum resources, listen to the feature lecture, and discuss potential classroom applications over light refreshments.

November’s lecture is Superfunded: Recreating Nature in a Postindustrial West

The EPA Superfund program was established in 1980 and over 1,700 locations have been placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). Superfund sites cover a vast array of environmental damages that contaminate the land and impact the health of citizens across the nation. Superfund’s goal is to clean up some of the nation’s most contaminated waste sites.

Former mining communities in the Intermountain West were built on a premise of wealth and power fortified by resource extraction. Mining and smelting generated incredible wealth as well as incredible waste. The Superfund solution to this waste reveals how governments, communities, and individual perceive and respond to the material consequences of our capitalist and industrial decisions.

Tuition and Fees: $35
Participants will receive 3 OPI Renewal Units

Enroll HERE for renewal units.

“Indian Country”: A Discussion About the Art of David Bradley and a Conversation About Conservation on the Blackfeet Reservation

The C.M. Russell Museum and the Nature Conservancy of Montana partner to bring a public conversation about land conservation on the Blackfeet Reservation to the C.M. Russell Museum. The evening will include an introduction by C.M. Russell Museum Curator, Emily Wilson, with brief opening remarks regarding the new fall exhibition Indian Country: The Art of David Bradley. Following an encore screening of 100 Years: One Woman’s Fight for Justice, featured speaker, Dylan DeRosier, Blackfeet Reservation Land Protection Specialist for The Nature Conservancy in Montana, will lead a discussion on history, policy, and the future of conservation on the Blackfeet Reservation.
100 Years: One Woman’s Fight for Justice is the inspiring documentary of Elouise Cobell, a Blackfeet woman from Montana, and the story of her 30-year fight for justice for 300,000 Native Americans whose mineral rich lands were grossly mismanaged by the United States Government. The film is directed by Melinda Janko and produced by Fire in the Belly Productions, Inc.

Earn OPI renewal units with Extreme History and Yellowstone Writing Project

Montana teachers can earn three OPI renewal units during an educational event at the Museum of the Rockies on Thursday, Oct. 11. The evening is hosted by the Extreme History Project, MoR and the Yellowstone Writing Project, a program of the MSU Department of English.

A public talk on the history of Montana’s Warm Springs hospital will be surrounded by events designed for educators, including an overview of museum resources and a discussion of potential classroom applications. The educator event begins at 5:30 with an optional museum tour at 4:15. The cost is $35; light refreshments are included.

The educational presentation by Lesley M. Gilmore includes an overview of Warm Springs’ early history as a self-sufficient campus. Manufacturing and farming were considered part of the care for the insane. The bucolic setting was typical of state mental institutions, yet has the added distinction of being based at the Warm Springs Mound, a calcite geothermal formation like that of the elephant mound in Mammoth Hot Springs of Yellowstone National Park.

The Warm Springs hospital still focuses – in reduced capacity since distributed clinical care was instituted in the 1960s – on individualized recovery programs to help patients transition back into to the community. The hospital has served the state for over 140 years and remains the only public psychiatric hospital in the state.

Teachers can register for this event through MSU Academic Technology and Outreach at http://ato.montana.edu/continuinged and look for “Warm Springs” or go to http://bit.ly/18FAHEALING. For more information call (406) 994-6550.

45th Annual Montana History Conference

The Montana Historical Society’s 45th Annual Montana History Conference will be Thursday, September 27, 2018, to Saturday, September 29, 2018, in Billings, MT.  This year’s theme is Rimrocks, Rivers, and Rolling Plains: History from the Yellowstone Valley.  Travel scholarships are available for teachers and students.  Visit the society’s website for registration information and travel scholarship information.  The deadline for advance registration is Friday, September 21, 2018.

Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons: Tribal Sovereignty in the Self-Determination Period

The Montana Historical Society is doing a two-month series called Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons.  Each session will be live streamed.  This week’s lesson is about Tribal Sovereignty in the Self-Determination Period.  Tribal Sovereignty is a frequently misunderstood concept.  Steve Lozar will give a short explanation on ‘Traditional’ Indian sovereignty and its evolution and application.  He will then follow with a discussion of the benefits and disadvantageous of perceived sovereignty in the Self-Determination Era.  About the speaker:  A member of the Salish, Kootenai, and Assiniboine tribes, Steve Lozar received his BA and MA in anthropology from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He served as director of education for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and taught anthropology at Salish Kootenai College for twenty-five years. As an elected member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal Council, Lozar was active in negotiating the CSKT water compact and the tribes’ the purchase of the Kerr Dam. He has served on the Montana Historical Society’s board of trustees since 2005.

OPI Renewal units will be available.  Contact Kirby Lambert at the Historical Society for more information.

Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons: Modern Revolution and Counterrevolution: Montana from the late 1960s through the 1990s

The Montana Historical Society is doing a two-month series called Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons.  Each session will be live streamed.  This week’s lesson is about Modern Revolution and Counterrevolution: Montana from the late 1960s through the 1990s.  Montana transformed from a conservative rural state to a more progressive urban one from the late 1960s through the 1970s, revolutionizing its state government through the adoption of its new constitution and reorganization of its executive branch. Under Democratic governors and legislatures, the state enacted numerous laws to protect the environment, establish a coal severance tax and trust fund, modernize its state institutions, and grant public employees to the right to collectively bargain. Journalist Chuck Johnson will outline the major events of this period, as well as of the more conservative era that followed in the 1980s and 1990s. About the speaker:  Chuck Johnson is a Great Falls native who covered most of this era as a journalist, working for 44 years as a state political and government reporter for the Associated Press, Great Falls Tribune, Lee Newspapers and Bozeman Daily Chronicle.  He has a bachelor’s degree in journalism and an M.A. in history from the University of Montana and currently serves on the Board of Trustees for the Montana Historical Society.

OPI Renewal units will be available.  Contact Kirby Lambert at the Historical Society for more information.

Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons: Montana and the Cold War

The Montana Historical Society is doing a two-month series called Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons.  Each session will be live streamed.  This week’s lesson is about Montana and the Cold War. The Cold War had a profound impact on Montana. Although distant from Washington, D.C., and Moscow, the state’s wide-open spaces and sparse population made Montana an important part of the country’s Cold War strategy. Along with the nuclear missiles based here, Montanans took an active role in defending the security of the United States through Civil Defense groups like the Ground Observer Corps.  About the speaker:  Jon Axline is a graduate of Montana State University and has worked at the Montana Department of Transportation since 1990. He is the author of a number of books and articles, including Conveniences Sorely Needed: Montana’s Historic Highway Bridges, Taming Big Sky Country: The History of Montana Transportation from Trails to Interstate,  and “Operation Skywatch: The Montana Ground Observer Corps, 1952–1959,” which appeared in the Summer 2017 issue of Montana The Magazine of Western History.

OPI Renewal units will be available.  Contact Kirby Lambert at the Historical Society for more information.

Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons: Homesteading Boom and Bust

The Montana Historical Society is doing a two-month series called Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons.  Each session will be live streamed.  This week’s lesson is about Homesteading Boom and Bust.  According to Professor Emeritus Robert Swartout, homesteading brought about the greatest single economic and demographic boom in the history of Montana. Swartout will examine the special forces that brought about this boom as well as the unique factors that produced the most dramatic “bust” in Montana’s storied history, before posing this question: Should historians consider the homestead collapse of the early twentieth century the most significant watershed event in all of Montana’s history?.  About the speaker:  Robert R. Swartout, Jr., is Professor Emeritus of History, Carroll College, Helena, Montana, where he taught both United States and East Asian history from 1978 to 2014. His many publications include Mandarins, Gunboats, and Power Politics: Owen Nickerson Denny and the International Rivalries in Korea (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1980); Montana Vistas: Selected Historical Essays (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1982); and Bold Minds and Blessed Hands: The First Century of Montana’s Carroll College (Helena: Carroll College Press, 2009). In 2006, he received the Outstanding Educator’s Award from the Montana Historical Society Board of Trustees. In early 2013, he was awarded the Governor’s Humanities Award by the State of Montana and Humanities Montana.

OPI Renewal units will be available.  Contact Kirby Lambert at the Historical Society for more information.

Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons: Disintegration: Montana’s Tribal Nations in the Early Reservations Years through the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act

The Montana Historical Society is doing a two-month series called Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons.  Each session will be live streamed.  This week’s lesson is about Disintegration: Montana’s Tribal Nations in the Early Reservation Years through the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act.  Between 1879 and 1934, the United States implemented a policy of assimilation aimed at dismantling tribal sovereignty and extinguishing tribal identities.  One aspect of this policy was the allotment in severalty of reservation lands, which checkerboarded Montana’s Indian reservations. This fragmentation of the physical landscape not only transferred a large percentage of treaty lands into white ownership but also generated long-lasting social, economic, and legal repercussions for tribes that intensified their cultural disintegration.  About the speaker:  Laura Ferguson earned her M.A. in Native American Studies at Montana State University. Since 2010, she has worked as an instructor of Native American Studies and Native American literature at Carroll College and Helena College and as a writer/editor of Indian Education for All education resources. Ferguson is a co-author of Beyond Schoolmarms and Madams, a collection of biographical sketches of Montana women. She currently works as an associate editor at the Montana Historical Society.

OPI Renewal units will be available.  Contact Kirby Lambert at the Historical Society for more information.