“Indian Country”: A Discussion About the Art of David Bradley and a Conversation About Conservation on the Blackfeet Reservation

The C.M. Russell Museum and the Nature Conservancy of Montana partner to bring a public conversation about land conservation on the Blackfeet Reservation to the C.M. Russell Museum. The evening will include an introduction by C.M. Russell Museum Curator, Emily Wilson, with brief opening remarks regarding the new fall exhibition Indian Country: The Art of David Bradley. Following an encore screening of 100 Years: One Woman’s Fight for Justice, featured speaker, Dylan DeRosier, Blackfeet Reservation Land Protection Specialist for The Nature Conservancy in Montana, will lead a discussion on history, policy, and the future of conservation on the Blackfeet Reservation.
100 Years: One Woman’s Fight for Justice is the inspiring documentary of Elouise Cobell, a Blackfeet woman from Montana, and the story of her 30-year fight for justice for 300,000 Native Americans whose mineral rich lands were grossly mismanaged by the United States Government. The film is directed by Melinda Janko and produced by Fire in the Belly Productions, Inc.

Russell For Learning: Paintings and Poets

During this day-long training session, teachers will be introduced to the first teaching unit from the C.M. Russell Museums new Russell for Learning Program, Paintings & Poets. Teachers will also become knowledgeable about Visual Thinking Strategies, tour the museum, visit our research center, learn about using the arts in their classrooms, and leave with new classroom resources. The course will be presented by Melissa Werber, the Education Coordinator at the C.M. Russell Museum.

Crossing Disciplines: Social Studies, Art, and the Common Core

Interested in meeting Common Core ELA standards while using art, theater, and creative writing to teach social studies and engaging your students in active learning? How about learning new techniques for helping students to analyze primary sources while helping them discover more about the world around them? If so, this workshop is for you.

Parade float with women dressed as Red Cross nurses

Image: Straight to Berlin Float, Red Cross Carnival, Hardin, MT, May 1918. Montana Historical Society Photograph Archives PAc 2000-46.43.
The morning session will be spent on Visual Thinking Strategies, a technique that uses teacher-facilitated discussions of art images to train students in “key behaviors sought by Common Core Standards” (vtshome.org) and learning about ways to teach art through social studies and ELA/social studies through art.

In the afternoon, participants will be introduced to other ready-to-use, cross-disciplinary lesson plans from the Montana Historical Society, including a lesson from one of our hands-on history footlockers and lessons that integrate theater, ELA, and history to investigate Montanans’ experiences during wartime. Attendees will leave with copies of the reader’s theater script and lesson plan “Letters Home from Montanans at War” as well as information on how to access many other free lessons from the Montana Historical Society.

The workshop is free. 6 OPI Renewal Units available. Registration is required to attend the event. Register here to attend.

About the Presenter: Jim Schulz is a state and nationally recognized history and science educator with over thirty years of experience teaching in the Helena, Montana, school district. Among his many awards, Jim was chosen as the Montana Centennial Bell History Teacher of the Year (1993), the Montana Teacher of the Year Runner Up (2000), the Disney American Teacher of the Year for Middle School Science (2000), and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists National Earth Science Teacher of the Year (2006).

Crossing Disciplines: Social Studies, Art, and the Common Core

Interested in meeting Common Core ELA standards while using art, theater, and creative writing to teach social studies and engaging your students in active learning? How about learning new techniques for helping students to analyze primary sources while helping them discover more about the world around them? If so, this workshop is for you.

Parade float with women dressed as Red Cross nurses

Image: Straight to Berlin Float, Red Cross Carnival, Hardin, MT, May 1918. Montana Historical Society Photograph Archives PAc 2000-46.43.
The morning session will be spent on Visual Thinking Strategies, a technique that uses teacher-facilitated discussions of art images to train students in “key behaviors sought by Common Core Standards” (vtshome.org) and learning about ways to teach art through social studies and ELA/social studies through art.

In the afternoon, participants will be introduced to other ready-to-use, cross-disciplinary lesson plans from the Montana Historical Society, including a lesson from one of our hands-on history footlockers and lessons that integrate theater, ELA, and history to investigate Montanans’ experiences during wartime. Attendees will leave with copies of the reader’s theater script and lesson plan “Letters Home from Montanans at War” as well as information on how to access many other free lessons from the Montana Historical Society.

The workshop is free. 6 OPI Renewal Units available. Registration is required to attend the event. Register here to attend.

About the Presenter: Jim Schulz is a state and nationally recognized history and science educator with over thirty years of experience teaching in the Helena, Montana, school district. Among his many awards, Jim was chosen as the Montana Centennial Bell History Teacher of the Year (1993), the Montana Teacher of the Year Runner Up (2000), the Disney American Teacher of the Year for Middle School Science (2000), and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists National Earth Science Teacher of the Year (2006).

Crossing Disciplines: Social Studies, Art, and the Common Core

Interested in meeting Common Core ELA standards while using art, theater, and creative writing to teach social studies and engaging your students in active learning? How about learning new techniques for helping students to analyze primary sources while helping them discover more about the world around them? If so, this workshop is for you.

Image: Straight to Berlin Float, Red Cross Carnival, Hardin, MT, May 1918. Montana Historical Society Photograph Archives PAc 2000-46.43.
The morning session will be spent on Visual Thinking Strategies, a technique that uses teacher-facilitated discussions of art images to train students in “key behaviors sought by Common Core Standards” (vtshome.org) and learning about ways to teach art through social studies and ELA/social studies through art.

In the afternoon, participants will be introduced to other ready-to-use, cross-disciplinary lesson plans from the Montana Historical Society, including a lesson from one of our hands-on history footlockers and lessons that integrate theater, ELA, and history to investigate Montanans’ experiences during wartime. Attendees will leave with copies of the reader’s theater script and lesson plan “Letters Home from Montanans at War” as well as information on how to access many other free lessons from the Montana Historical Society.

The workshop is free. 6 OPI Renewal Units available. Registration is required to attend the event. Register here to attend.

About the Presenter: Jim Schulz is a state and nationally recognized history and science educator with over thirty years of experience teaching in the Helena, Montana, school district. Among his many awards, Jim was chosen as the Montana Centennial Bell History Teacher of the Year (1993), the Montana Teacher of the Year Runner Up (2000), the Disney American Teacher of the Year for Middle School Science (2000), and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists National Earth Science Teacher of the Year (2006).

Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Special Webinar Series for Montana Teachers Part 3: Art as Argument: Contemporary Artists’ Voices Monday, April 16, 2018 (3:30 – 4:30 p.m., MT) How do contemporary American artists use visual tools to persuade? How can persuasive artwork be a springboard to help students construct their own arguments?

How can American art be a tool for building critical thinkers in the classroom? In this special three-part webinar series for Montana teachers, experience how educators at the Smithsonian American Art Museum use inquiry-based approaches with artwork to engage students as thinkers, readers, and writers, while supporting content across multiple disciplines. Gain practical strategies for integrating art effectively into your teaching, and learn to navigate the Smithsonian’s online resources for educators. Webinars are open to all Montana teachers, though they are especially recommended for English/language arts, social studies or history, and art teachers for grades 5-12.

Part 3: Art as Argument: Contemporary Artists’ Voices
Monday, April 16, 2018 (3:30 – 4:30 p.m., MT)
How do contemporary American artists use visual tools to persuade? How can persuasive artwork be a springboard to help students construct their own arguments?
Link to join: https://zoom.us/j/127740159